Read All About It

Find out what Swans class has been up to.

“Pupils feel safe and have a good understanding of how to keep safe. This is because the curriculum provides regular and appropriate opportunities for them to learn how to keep safe, including when using the internet.”


Ofsted 2017

Learning At Home

Find resources to help your child learn at home.

Swans Class

Key Stage 2 – Years 5 & 6

Upper Key Stage 2 starts in Year 5 and finishes when the children leave primary school at the end of Year 6. Emphasis in this class is still placed on a balanced and creative curriculum, but one that also encourages independence and self-organisational skills. By the end of Key Stage 2, the children will have had the opportunity to take part in a number of transition activities (so they feel more prepared for High school), will have had the opportunity to take part in a week-long residential trip and they will have also taken their Key Stage 2 SATs tests.

On This Page

On this page you will find news about our class, an overview of the work we are doing this half-term and links to online learning resources.

Mrs Edwards

Swans Class Teacher

Latest News From Swans Class

Residential – A Roaring Success

On Monday, 8th July, Mr Bassett, Mrs Bilner & Mrs Edwards took 26 excited Swans on a 5 day long residential trip to PGL, Caythorpe Court, Lincolnshire. Setting off just after 9.15am, we made the drive up the A14 to Hinchingbrooke Country Park in Huntingdon for a...

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Summer Vacation – The Musical!

Summer Vacation – The Musical!

On Thursday 18th July, the Swans class entertained a packed hall by performing their play' We're all going on a Summer Holiday'.  The story line was based on a family trip to the Poplins Holiday Camp.   There was some brilliant acting, singing and fantastic...

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Sizzling Sports Day Success

Sizzling Sports Day Success

Friday 5th July saw the annual sports day at the school.  The sun shone, crowds gathered and children enjoyed a variety of events; the atmosphere was fantastic! Otters were the victorious winners and gained 40 house points! Well done. Thank you to all who helped with...

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Archaeology Club

This half term, Mrs Marshall is running a lunchtime Archaeology club for children in Owls and Swans classes. Over the last two weeks, the children had to work together to chip dinosaur bones out of rock. It was very difficult, and took them a long time. Once all the...

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Pyjamarama Day

Pyjamarama Day

On Friday 7th June  the children (and adults) came to school in their pyjamas to celebrate Pyjamarama day donating 50p to the BookTrust charity. The children enjoyed a range of activities and enjoyed having stories read to them by different adults. We raised over £60...

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Stratford’s Sports Update

Stratford’s Sports Update

May was a great month at Stratford St Mary School for Sport and PE. In the two sporting competitions, U11 Swimming and U11 Netball, we achieved 6th place in both events, with 12 teams competing altogether in the Swimming and 16 teams in the Netball. A huge well done...

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We Are Working On

Spring

Science

Evolution & Inheritance

• Recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents in the context of inheritance.
• Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways in the context of environmental variation.
• Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments; Identify how adaptation may lead to evolution by examining the theories of evolution constructed by Darwin and Wallace.
• Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments; Recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago in the context of the evolution of plants and animals.
• Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments; Recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago in the context of the evolution of human beings.
• Identify how adaptation may lead to evolution by examining the advantages and disadvantages of specific adaptations and the role of human intervention in the process of evolution.

History

The Mayans

• Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of world history, establishing clear
narratives within and across the periods they study by learning about the Maya civilisation and understanding who they were and when and where they lived.
• Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information by learning about the religious beliefs and practices of the Maya people and the gods they believed in.
• Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information by learning about how the Maya invented and used their calendars and number system.
• Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources and that different versions of past events may exist, giving some reasons for this by identifying and using sources of evidence to learn about the Maya cities and some of the people who explored and documented them.
• Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference and significance through learning about the Mayan writing system.
• Note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms by learning about the food the ancient Maya people ate and its religious and cultural significance.

Geography

The Americas

• Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied in the context of North and South America.
• Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities in the context of places in North and South America.
• Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night) in the context of identifying and describing a range of places across the Americas.
• Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle in the context of comparing how weather and climate across America is affected by geographical location.
• Use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies in the context of undertaking fieldwork to identify human and physical features of the local area.
• Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom [East Anglia] and a region within North or South America in the context of comparing human and physical features of the local area with a region of North America.
• Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities in the context of learning about the wonders of the world and where they are located (specifically those of the Americas).

Art

Central and South America

• Great artists, architects and designers in history in the context of Frida Khalo, Leonora Carrington, Joaquin Torres Garcia, Diego Rivera, Beatriz Milhazes & Carlos Paez Vilaro.
• To improve mastery of art and design techniques in the context of clay, dream catchers, coloured drawing and papers, printing and drum making.

Design & Technology

Automata Animals

• Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups in the context of researching animals that will be used in their mechanical models.
• Understand and use mechanical systems in their products (for example cams) in the context of understanding how cams can be used to make a model move.
• Understand and use mechanical systems in their products (for example cams) in the context of understanding how changing the shape of the cam changes the movement of the follower.
• Select from and use a wider range materials and components, including construction materials according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities in the context of selecting materials to make a simple cam mechanism.
• Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at individuals or groups in the context of developing design criteria for the Automata Animals.
• Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example cutting, shaping, joining and finishing), accurately in the context of using tools and equipment to perform the job of cutting, joining and finishing wood to make a frame.
• Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work in the context of evaluating the product design.
• Understand and use mechanical systems in their products in the context of using a cam mechanism to make a model of an animal move.

P.E.

Basketball & Hockey

• Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance in the context of the basketball and hockey dribbling technique.
• Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination in the context of basketball and hockey passing techniques; of pivoting and footwork; of keeping possession and of marking and dodging.
• To play competitive games, modified where appropriate, and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending in the context of basketball and hockey
Swimming

Computing

Scratch
• Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems
• Solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
• Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs
• Work with variables and various forms of input and output
• Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs

French

Food

• Appreciate stories, songs, poems and rhymes in the language in the context of food.
• Understand key features and patterns of basic grammar in the context of requesting something to eat and stating preferences.
• Describe people, places, things and actions orally and in writing in the context of describing food by colour.
• Describe people, places, things and actions orally and in writing in the context of describing objects by size.
• Engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and help in the context of preparing, eating and talking about food.

Family and Friends

• Present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences; in the context of family.
• Broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into familiar written material, including through using a dictionary; explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words; conjugate high-frequency verbs; in the context of pets.
• Explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words; develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases; in the context of the alphabet.
• Understand basic grammar and conjugate high-frequency verbs; write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly; in the context of introducing people.
• Speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures; develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases; in the context of spelling familiar words and names.
• Broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into familiar written material, including through using a dictionary; say or write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly; in the context of rooms in the home

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